Swimming in a lake full of jellyfish


A brave swimmer submerged in the lake on the Pacific island of Palau is surrounded by hundreds of jellyfish.


With the Jellyfish isolated in the lake, their stings weakened and these amazing images show tourists can now swim alongside the jellyfish without fear of being stung.


Photographer Kevin Davidson has been visiting the lake for 15 years to capture photos of tourists swimming with jellyfish.


Not for the faint hearted: A swimmer takes a dip in the lake, which now contains an estimated 8 million jellyfish.


Photographer Kevin Davidson has been visiting the lake for 15 years to capture photos of tourists swimming with jellyfish.


Photographer Kevin Davidson has been visiting the lake for 15 years to capture photos of tourists swimming with jellyfish.


Swimmers feel hundreds of “soft blobs” gentle touching their skin as they paddle in Palau Lake.

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